Skip to main content

About your Search

20121205
20121213
STATION
CURRENT 10
CNNW 7
CSPAN2 5
MSNBCW 5
CNBC 4
CSPAN 3
FBC 3
KPIX (CBS) 3
MSNBC 3
KQED (PBS) 2
SFGTV2 2
WGN (CW) 2
CNN 1
KOFY 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 68
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 68 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> educational leaders and staff, more than 85 musicals showcased what they have to offer. john lewis talked to some parents as they shop around to find the best schools for their children. >> it was not a game but education that brought a danger of hundreds of students and parents. >> i have tried to find a school in my community. >> by and large, this -- >> it is our job. >> this is the sixth year for the charter highlighting selective enrollment. contentious issue in chicago. on friday, for more public charter schools were approved for the city. at the same time, closing neighborhood schools run by the district. there is also the possibility of a chartered network sharing space with an under enrolled school. >> we have to be open to considering other options. the quirks charter schools are privately run but they take public money. >> we all need to be working together. we all want to the same thing. we cannot keep kids trapped in the system. >> across town on the west side hundreds of others gathered to talk about reinforcing public schools and said of enhancing the charters. >> i hope th
york and across the country. is the attitude about urban education and how many kids we are losing their are not graduating from schools. basically saying, we have an issue here we have to deal with. i try to discuss that with other mayors across the state and with the decision makers. we have to come up with solutions. it is a burden for a lot of cities, not just school taxes but property taxes and trying to balance the budget to provide the services needed. this are two major problems. this is a very old city. we have a lot of beautiful historic buildings. and in many ways when people do not take care of them, it is hard to keep them on the tax rolls or make sure people invest in them. basically, i have been through five governors in my 19 years as the mayor. i deal directly with the governors and the people in the senate and the assembly. we talk about the state capital which was tax -- 74% tax exempt. a lot of it was a result of the state taking over a large percentage of our city. a lot of it was non for profits. i have had a good working relationship with people in the state
address on the economy, jobs, and education policy. >> hello, everybody. over the last few weeks, there's been a lot of talk about deadlines we're facing on jobs and taxes and investments. but with so much noise and so many opinions flying around, it can be easy to lose sight of what this debate is really about. it's not about which political party comes out on top, or who wins or loses in washington. it's about making smart decisions that will have a real impact on your lives and the lives of americans all across the country. right now, middle-class tax cuts are set to expire at the end of the year. time is running out. and there are two things that can happen. first, if congress does nothing, every family in america will see their income taxes automatically go up on january 1st. a typical middle-class family of four would get a $2,200 tax hike. that would be bad for families, it would be bad for businesses, and it would drag down our entire economy. now, congress can avoid all this by passing a law that prevents a tax hike on the first $250,000 of everybody's income. that means 98% of
. >> is our education system outdated? >> no. >> our union advocacy, is that outdated, how they go about fighting for it? i don't know. that question was put on the table. whether factories are shut, that means jobs have left. if you look at wages enjoyed by workers in right-to-work states, i think it should be put on the table. where do they fare? i have not done the analysis so it's hard to say. >> it's a question, though, willie, whether you want the job or not. >> right. >> i asked bob riley, i've said this 1,000 times, it seems extraordinarily important if you're a union member in the northeast, and like me, you want your factories running again. i asked bob riley, i don't understand, why did mercedes go to tuscaloosa county, alabama, instead of filling up the factories in connecticut? 15 minutes away from yale. or in rhode island. 20 minutes away from brown. i mean, right by some of the most highly trained, brilliant minds in the world. that's easy. the work force rules are so insane there, there's no way that mercedes or bmw or airbus would ever dream of going to those states. do
can't. >> you can't, you shouldn't. >> right. >> when you start slashing education, when you start slashing r&d, transportation -- >> it's over. >> -- what you're doing is, you're slashing about 3%, 4% of the budget. and you're leaving the parts of the budget that blow a hole in the deficit and destroy this economy over the next 20 years. >> by the way, we won't go over the cliff for all the reasons we're talking about. even if we do, my friends on the street tell me, it's not a disaster. it's baked in. because we're going to get it done even after the fact. so you're talking about a few points in the market. >>> we're just moments away, joe and i will be removing -- >> oh, no! there it is! >> ow! >> it's all for a great cause. >> i don't know if it's that good. >> i don't know. is this going to be good television or kind of yucky? okay. we'll be right back. americans are always ready to work hard for a better future. since ameriprise financial was founded back in 1894, they've been committed to putting clients first. helping generations through tough times. good times. never takin
get an ivy league education for free. but first this is "today" on nbc. >>> we're back at 8:46. what if you could take courses from prestigious universities like princeton, stanford, duke and others for free? well, you can. jamie gangel is in washington to explain how. good morning to you. >> good morning, savannah. truly a revelation in education. some of the elite universities are offering these classes, let's say it again, for free. and they are attracting millions of students, include iing a cou who might surprise you. from finance to calculus to poetry. >> let's go to a second passage. >> reporter: world class professors are now offering their courses absolutely free. want to discover your inner passion for emily dickinson? >> her work is done in the realm of possibility. >> reporter: all you need is a computer and internet access. classes are known as massive open online courses or mooc. offered by several start-up companies, the largest and fastest growing is called coursera, the brainchild of these two professors. their goal is to revolutionize education. >> giving us the opp
owned by the career education corporation, one of the major league for-profit colleges. his parents didn't have the means to pay for his education but helped him out by cosigning the loans. now the student and the parents have $103,000 in student loan debt. one of the loans has a 13% interest rate, and the balance continues to rise. this young man, young man would like to finish his degree but he can't afford to. he can't borrow any more money. he is too deeply in debt. how about that for a dilemma? $103,000 in debt, no degree. he can't borrow the money to get a degree. many of these students find out these for-profit courses they took are worthless. they don't transfer anywhere. the diplomacy themselves turn out to be worthless and many employers just laugh at them. you would never know that from the advertising these for-profit schools engage in. i had a group of students in my office this morning. they were from archbishop carroll high school, not too far from the capitol here. they are students who know a little bit about being wooed and enticed by colleges, universities. we talked a
reform. >> rose: right. >> i think really looking at regulatory structures, educational structures, things like that. >> rose: but that costs money. >> i needs to be revisited. the look, i think we've got to get kind of the $4 trillion thing behind us and then -- but it's not like the government shouldn't invest in anything one of the things that has come out of every jobs council i've been a part of that is almost universal until the b.r.t. is that that thisntoury needs to invest in infrastructure. this is something that the president and the b.r.t., jobs councils, all agree but it runs into problems because what's -- the funding structure going to be? how do we pay for it and things like that? >> rose: that's the potential for growth and growth is the essential thing. build the infrastructure, build the education. >> anybody doesn't that doesn't think once we do this four trillion dollar down payment that growth isn't the most important thing is crazy. so that's what we have to be looking at for broader tax reform. >> rose: and simpson-bowles is a good guideline? >> i think simps
-care industry, hoping to develop stellar health education, research, innovation in practice, all in the quest for great health-care you. i hope you will be able to see what we call health-care in michigan where so much investment in medical health related work has been made. beatrix hoffman is chair of history at northern illinois. she completed her ph.d. as everyone at my table did at rutgers university in 1996. she has written extensively on the history of american health care reform including a 2001 book entitled the wages of sickness, the politics of health insurance, in progress of america at the university of north carolina. in her talk today she is going to speak about her latest book, the book titled is "health care for some". i have the feeling it is relevant to our times. the talk is entitled health care for all, women, activism and women's right to health. this is a history -- her book rather and her talk today will be partly, a history of rights and rationing in the united states from the great depression to the present, and the book just came out by the university of chicago pres
. education reporter lee ann has the story. >>reporter: los angeles person here was the only student at the high school to get that uc berkeley. >> everybody was happy because i was like yes i got in but i won't make. >> i won't be able to go. how aim going to pay for it. >>reporter: he's an undocumented student and does not qualify for any federal money. coordinator of the undocumented student program at cal. >> federal pel grant, work study, loan aren't eligible to undocumented students. >>reporter: rivera had a small private scholarship and worked odd jobs to help put himself through cal. but it wasn't enough money to make ends meet. that's why uc berkeley chancellor robert spear head add scholarship program to help students likely vary a.evelyn and walter haas junior fund rae responded with 1 million dollar award. >> the fund one of the core pieces of work is about equal chances, equal opportunities, leveling the playing field so everybody has a chance to succeed in life. >>reporter: about 200 undocumented students at uc berkeley from 20 countries will receive a portion of
spending of our government, things like defense, homeland security, education, it's so-called entitlements. you've got to kurt althe increase in spending on things like medicare that's putting us in the hole. >> what you don't want to do you don't want the make it punitive for people to make charitable donations. to me that's another lose argument for the republican. you got to be very careful where you encourage the cutting of entitlements. >> yeah. one thing i don't think i should ask a democrat to do is turn medicare into a voucher program. you know, the paul ryan budget had a premium support system, which i think makes sense, but a lot of people on the left are not going to go there, but i think we could adjust the age of eligibility for medicare from 65 to 67 over the next 30 years. cue ask all three of us to pay the full cost of part b premiums. >> prescription drugs. >> the prescription drug benefit. make us pay the full costs. we can afford it. but here's what i would say, how this movie ends -- and that's your question. >> yes. >> we will wind up losing on probably the rate issue
was educate latino voters, educationing them on how to vote and how to vote in arizona because we have a mail-in ballot process and a voter i.d. law in place so a lot of organizations were educate latino voters, it may be easier to sign up on the mail-in list so you don't have to deal with identification if you don't have the proper i.d. and choose to vote in person. i think that explains why there were so many mail-in ballots cast in the general election in 2012. >> i want to get back to the senate race but stick with the voter i.d. requirements. talk about the restrictions, what exactly the requirements are, and in particular there's been this discussion at the national level about republicans are using voter i.d. requirements to tamp down on voter turnout from certain areas. what are the concerns? how is the latino population-latino voters in arizona -- how are they dealing with that? are there problems? is there going to be a battle over trying to tight 'the voter i.d. requirements? is it a photo i.d. requirement? >> really quickly. arizona's voter i.d. law was put -- voted on by the citi
talk about education, they defund it. talk about voter suppression, they deny voting to people, and i just can't embrace that anymore and be true to myself. >> let me read some of your own quotes back to you. hard to be more conservative than i am on the issues. back on 2009. pro life, pro gun, pro family, i'm anti tax. have you changed on those four specific things? >> no, i'm not saying that at all. i'm pro life, but i don't believe in imposing my will on other people. i believe people should support and protect the second amendment. i believe raising taxes isn't something anybody wants to do. certainly i never wanted to do it as a legislator or as governor. i believe in public safety. i believe in protecting the environment. i live in florida, the most beautiful state in the country in my humble opinion. these things i have always believed in. education, ethics, the environment, protecting the economy, and fighting for people. >> let's focus on taxes for a moment. in the fiscal cliff debate, tax is a big part of that. where do you stand on that if you are anti tax? >> anti tax, but
schoolteacher who spent the better part of 40 years educating our children. she deserves and needs to e retire next year. she's 64. i'm here for darlene, a -- [inaudible] native who receives her life saving blood pressure medication through medicare part d. i'm here for alice, an african-american grandmother of ten who receives treatment for her diabetes through medicaid. this woman worked her whole life in the hotel industry. i'm here for my friend mark who owns a small business. he's a construction manager. >> ma'am, ma'am, i'm going to ask you to sit down so we can have this discussion. >> i'm happy to leave -- [inaudible] >> out! [inaudible conversations] >> out! [inaudible conversations] >> we're gonna vote -- [inaudible] the economy! we're gonna vote, not float the economy! we're gonna vote, not float the economy! we're gonna vote, not float the economy! >> okay. i'm gonna take a moment to try to, um, talk, and we'll see if it works. i don't know if other people are here. but i actually think that what we just saw is, um, a true reflection of how hard what we're trying to do is. i'm real
product coming up? >> i think education is coming up. there is too much regulation and areas we can't touch with unions and bureaucracy. especially college education. college education going online will be big in the next five years. >> do you have investments in that? >> the have an investment in the guy who did the google car doing online education, a stanford professor and decided online education is next and google didn't want to do it and we're backing him and it will be fun to see. >> marc andreessen, thank you for being here. send it back to the studios. >> this is embarrassing. she is like throwing herself at the camera. i've never seen this side of you. >> there's so few voices willing to say what he said out loud. >> andrew, we asked him to guest host. he can talk the disrupter stuff and politics. >> he's the ultimate disrupter. >> another guy came out. will you do that? >> marc? >> we will have him come out. he's on his way back. >> becky will be back by then so you don't have to worry about me. >> right. exactly. got it. >> she'll leave the ring. >> need some muscle to k
versus virginia. employment discrimination, 13 years after brown versus board of education. the supreme court had a marriage case on its bokt in 1956. but kicked it. because it didn't want to touch it with a ten-foot pole so waited for more states to come around. it's also the year that guess who's coming to dinner comes out. there's a cultural legal convergence. we're at that moment for the gay community now. one of the historians in the gay marriage trial, nancy kauts, a historian of marriage, she said one of the emancipated slaves after -- the slaves flocked to get married. she testified that one of the emancipated slaves said the marriage covenant is a foundation of all of our rights. so i totally agree with rea that this is just the beginning but it is an important cornerstone to building full equality for lgbt citizens. >> this question of sort of how enslaved people thought about marriage, the extent to which they engaged in formal marriages and then the extent to which ones given the freedom it became one of the first things that free people did to represent their freedom is ins
from steve cook, head of the michigan education association was a guest on our program. the union leadership was working, meeting with governor schneider and he said no the last thing i want is -- i don't want to split this state the way they did in wisconsin and ohio. no no, no. i don't want anything to do with that. i want to work together with the unions. i don't want anything to do with this rumors that they might try to pass some so-called right-to-work legislation in michigan. they met for like about ten days and then on friday, the republican-controlled legislature forced through -- get this now -- with no public hearings no debate on the floor, no members of the public allowed to testify for it or against it, no members of the public even allowed in the state capitol building when they passed this bill it would make michigan the 24th state to have the so-called right-to-work legislation on the books. they forced it through and then rick sha nidor in a total turnaround, a total flip-flop a total doubl
poverty. highlighting things like education are a path laid to burning the right to be heard. because a lot of communities are saying we just don't believe that you care about us. i think that having folks who communicate well is a ticket to making that hard battle happen. greg: i read his books and offense. your latest one, you revert to the republican party as hard wing conservatives. that they are being pushed into political relevance. >> yes, for example, the fight over the fiscal cliff is taking place between speaker boehner and the white house. they put republicans in the senate in a rare type of position where they are in the game, but they are not the leaders of the game. see what is going on in the senate in general. we're republicans should have the majority of the senate, if not highly ontological candidates were nominated by the party base. thinking of someone like richard murdoch in indiana. there's no reason the democrats should not hold that seat. they are putting republicans in the senate at a disadvantage. >> the other thing is that ted cruz is a tea party candidate,
. beyonce sound like she has a fifth grade education, she can't talk. excuse me, i said i am a fan. we have to call a spade a spade. >> that's what is interesting. she is known for being a straight talker. beyonce does have the documentary coming out. going to show behind the scenes vufz h views of her life, baby blue ivy, business projects. will air february 16 on hbo. beyonce's rep did not comment. and williams decleanined to comment. you know, i love beyonce. some times difficult to understand what she says. she's got that very -- >> i am not going there. you and wendy can go out on the limb. >> i love beyonce. she does have a certain drawl that makes her a little difficult to understand. >> a really uncomfortable moment at a cocktail party one of these days with the two meeting. we love beyonce. >> we do. we do. williams calls it like she sees them. lake i do. >> you got to hand it to her if she is going to disht o it out. dish it to any body. she can take it too. >> she can take it? >> i worked with wendy when she did her radio show. one of her legal eagles. i dished it to her. she cou
to education. to educate the younger people and the population we need to get out and work for what you have. stuart: i am beginning to like you. washington politicians bicker over the fiscal cliff, very frustrating. at the end of the day we're going to look more like europe. my take on that is next. charles: wall street doesn't have to face tim cook. >> ruled this video tape back in the new year. this will be apple's those profitable quarter ever. rolled this case back. make fun of me later. i am saying it. of the one that was clayton morris in the last hour making a bold prediction of apple. the stock has been getting back but right now it is down a bit more, $6 lower at 11:40. let's check the overall market of 44 points putting the dow above 13,100. netflix shares up again. nicole: this is showing resiliency for netflix. this is a stock people thought would be to the downside based on what we heard. we heard they posted something on facebook, regulated, they are upset with them so we have regulators now warning netflix about exactly that, they can't just postings on facebook. they have to
. that is deviating away from what the real problems in education are. if you know that finland has the number one school system in the world and part of that process is making the standards so rigorous and they only the best of the best and same time they pay significantly more for teachers and once they earned that title. they earned complete autonomy over the class roommate. part of the problem we have so much regulation and mandates and we are dictated to how to teach in our classrooms. what is the point in making standards when we don't have the option to use professional judgment as it am is. >> steve: thank you very much for joining us on the wednesday morning from beautiful orlando, florida. thank you. >> thank you for having me. >> gretchen: we have a hypochrissy alert. remember michael moor's latest ovie bashing tax rate breaks. >> steve: and a big secret and writing a letter to his younger self as a warning for others not to do the same thing. coach k will reveal that letter with brian next on "fox and friends" ♪ ♪ than that though, there's a kick to it. wahlalalalallala! smooth, bu
products within a few months. that is being rolled out at education, energy, treasury, u.s. aid, other agencies as well. these programs are celebrating the use of open data and hopefully will provide some additional support. i think there are even folks here who have been part of these events. we're excited for that continued support and hope you can all join this initiative in the neutral. -- future. >> so, earlier you were talking a little about kind of how san francisco came in in terms of actually ading the officer. more broadly how do you think san francisco compares and what are some of the other cities that are doing really well in terms of open data? >> i should be clear. when san francisco is third, we have a pact. i'll add to that actually. what's great in san francisco is there is not just going to be a chief data officer. there is also the office of civic innovation. jay's team, shannon's team. by having both of those units in place i think there is going to be a really powerful team. because you can't just open up the data. you have to do things like this, where you get th
grandchildren's education. it was bought by the ceo of a website called gottahaveit.com. i can almost see my father twitching, desperate for that jersey. >>> and now for a look at the weather, here's nbc meteorologist dylan dreyer. she has the weather channel forecast. good morning once again, dylan. >> good morning to you. we are actually starting off with a decent morning in the northeast. a little chilly. temperatures are only in the 30s, but it's not raining yet. that rain is going to move in a little later this afternoon. for now, though, we have a cold front, and it's separating kansas city, which is in the 50s right now, versus denver, which is down around 30 degrees to start off this morning. so we are going to see some of that cooler air begin to spread eastward over the course of the day. the northern half of the country, that's where we're going to see some rain showers. it's mostly rain showers, a few light snow showers will mix in, but you have to go up into minneapolis to see any of that. there's really not too much cold air across most of the country. then as we go into the we
exceptionalism, only it won't be called that. the board of education approved teaching the, quote, creation and organization of the american government and what has made it successful. so they'll do it. they just won't call it that. >> brian: let's take a look at what happened some of the best moments. let's pick some of the moments in the nfl. european version of football. indiana, huge win over georgetown. another national championship. they beat georgetown 1-0. their eighth championship. congratulations to georgetown. best rookie moves as we switch to football, david wilson. he fumbled earlier in the year. then all of a sudden, he thought, i think i can run this back all the way. 97 yards. he'd have three touchdowns on the day. he would have more yards than anybody else in giant history and lead the giants to a victory over the not so mighty saints. >>> three theroux -- throw under duress, ben roethlisberger. final score 34-24. chargers upset the steelers. that's a quick look at what's happening in the world of sports. >> gretchen: earlier we were talking about the top five gripes that
of education which invalidated racial segregation in public schools split the nation in half. within two decades it had become iconic. a high court ruling would similarly divide the nation in 2013 yet given how quickly public opinion is evolving within a decade or so, such a decision would be youthfully applauded. what justice would not be tempted to offer the opinion within a few short years would be known as the brown vs. board of education of the gay rights movement. [ applause ] that was from michael klahrman. >> helpful paragraphs. >> stephanie: mostly helpful. grasping at gay straws here. john roberts wore a sweater around his neck in fire island in 1973. [ ♪ dramatic ♪ ] >> '78? >> stephanie: something. >> that picture was later. >> it was the '80s. >> the collars were too narrows. if it was the 70s, they would have been out to here. >> stephanie: what good does that information do for anybody? we're all very tense. all right. i will talk to some actual legal experts as we -- you know who we should get?
for us. if you will do something on stem education, qualified members help us identify companies from understanding of their home markets. we work with local chambers, members of congress, and we have developed a network of convenience, local business leaders better interested in participating and know how to recruit people. so far we are brought more than two thousand people to the white house this year alone representing more than 500 towns and cities, probably around 1800 companies. out of 10 our ceo's. two out of 10 are investors. captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] [captioning performed by national captioning institute]. referred to the house calendar and ordered printed. pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20 the unfinished business is the question on agreeing to the speaker's approval of the journal which the chair will put de novo. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the ayes have it the journal stand as i proved. mr. sessions: mr. speaker. the demand the yeas and nays. the speaker pro tempore: the yeas and nays have been reques
environments and gives them housing and education. the school says its scholarships had nothing to do with athletics. charges have been filed against the former mayor's nephew. >> he pleaded not guilty and is able to leave the building. he was here for about one hour. he will be back here at the same time next monday after it attorneys decide whether they will be seeking a new judge. the nephew deprived at 26 and california just after 9:00. accompanied by three attorneys and no family members. he did not answer any questions from reporters. he waited in the security line. he was randomly assigned to judge arthur hill. across as done in open court. he pleaded not guilty to a charge of involuntary manslaughter. he said he would not voluntarily recuse himself from the case. the judge was also appointed to the board when daly was mayor. he came back to serve as chief deputy state attorney. despite all of that the judge says he can be fair and impartial. he wants to give them time to consider. in 2004 as a drunken brawl resulted in a death of a man. the 21 year-old was the aggressor an
and build an education center there. 46 people flying on september 11th from newark, newark, to san francisco were killed when flight 93 crashed in that field. the families say they're hoping for a boost from private donors including fortune 500 companies. >> i feel nothing but peace when i'm at the site, when i'm stand oughted sacred ground. >> 450,000 people have already visited the memorial. >>> has our obsession with cell phones risen to the level of an addiction? some researchers say yes. they say factors such as materialism and impulsiveness play a big role in tipping cell phone use into an addiction especially when phones are used excessively in public. that's when we're signaling that we have a shiny object, status symbol. young adults check their phones an average of 60 times a day. >>> new details about the kansas city chiefs player who killed his girlfriend and then committed suicide. among other things, police are now saying that he may have had another girlfriend. jovan belcher shot the mother of his daughter at their home early in the morning and today we learned that
the u.s. not necessarily people but the education for producing. >> now, you see, i disagree with that. the skills are here americans can make these products. they can make them as good and better earn anybody in the entire world. we have a great skilled workforce. if they are not teaching some of those skills here, that's easy to fix. and way back in the days when i used to work with jerry brown, we talked about finding the skills that companies need for their special products, you know, computers or iphones or wind turbins or solar panels or whatever and making sure to be teaching those skills in our community colleges and vocational schools. you have to marry the two. but clearly, with that, americans can certainly do those jobs. but that's just one little point of difference here i think this is great news. let us know what you think about it 866-55-press. i will be damn honest with you. as a liberal and saz a progressive, i have been really feeling guilty about all of my apple stuff. i bought two ipads at christmas last year, one for each of our s
.e.d. while, it's a good intention, plenty of people have education who go out and kill people or drive drunk and end up -- >> greg: a dead kid isn't getting his g.e.d. and going to church. there is a punishment for that. >> bob: there are kids i know alcoholics who go for weekend in jail. there they have to do intensive therapy on the drinking and drugging. that makes a lot more sense than going, than forced to go to church. >> andrea: g.e. d/b/a behind bars. >> dana: maybe the judge exercising his judgment, saw something redeeming in this young man and thought that he was making the best decision based on his statement. nibble local control, counties and states should be able to pick their judges. i assume he's elected or appointed by political appointee. that is what they do. make judgments. >> eric: i make a point. we don't know if this was the defendant's proposal to say hey, i'll go to church and the judge said fine, put it on the list, too. >> bob: you don't think it will survive the courts do you? >> dana: i won't take the aclu seriously until they defend the guy who made the video th
. >> this is where i disagree. >> he's one of the most educated men ever, and we're still questioning whether he's born in the country. >> here's the thing. we actually haven't had a conversation about race, and that's where i disagree with you. because a conversation about race is something that happens outside of the dog whistle attacks. both sides -- either side, no side, throw it all off. we were called a nation of cow yards by eric holder. the president had a moment with professor gates. he had all these times when he could have led on the issue. regardless of color, any president has that opportunity. he had greater opportunity. instead he used it. >> sean: we'll put you all back in chains? >> was that not an opportunity to talk about chains when he invited the police officer? >> that was a photo op. the real opportunity would have been -- in his own words, he said i don't know exactly what happened, but the police acted irresponsibly. that's not leadership. that is putting something in a context where you can use it for a narrative. >> sean: our own vice-president used it in this election
paying deficit while still investing in education and research that are important to growing our economy and if we are serious about protecting middle class families then we are going to have to ask the wettiest americans to pay higher tax rates. that's one principle i won't compromise on. >> higher tax rate, of course, at issue and whether or not as republicans had hoped they could just close loopholes and tax deductions and that could. >> he keep say the wealthiest americans but $250,000 that's not the wealthest of america. >> right. so there was some word during the campaign when joe biden let slip that $1 million would be the threshold for which they would begin to tax the wealthest americans. marco rubio on a saturday morning addressed as well. they are going after each other. senator marco rubio and president obama in these dueling addresses. >> we must get the national debt under control. taxes will not solve our 16 trillion-dollar debt. only economic growth and form of entitlement programs will control the debt. woe must reform the job killing tax code by getting rid of unjustif
of the or 8:00 education foundation. i am a director of oracle. >> you are holding a mighty piece of card board there showing how much oracle is giving to the food bank. >> i am. would you like me to do the big reveal? >> i would. only by building up the tension. does oracle set aside the money? this is not the only thing you d right? >> that's right. we do a lot of things. it is a combination of monetary donations from the company. company matching gifts for employee gifts, and employee volunteers. >> perfect. what do you do? how much does this help? what do you do with the money specifically? >> oracle has long been one of our significant partners. they really help us plan for the future. every dollar that is donated to us is for nutritious meals. >> i think it is about time. what do you think? how much did we collect? >> $100,000. >> 100,000. that is as much as we've had all season. we have quite an audience in here and well cheered, by the way. that is a huge contribution. we really appreciate it. how many people is that going to feed? >> we are serving a quarter of a million every mo
, today's bill is modeled after the work done by jim webb after the education opportunity program that dan took advantage of when he was just a young boy. senator akaka was chairman of the veterans' affairs committee from 2007 to 2010, has thousands and thousands iraqi and afghanistan veterans were coming home from combat. as democrats collectively worked to bring our troops home from iraq, dan akaka has labored with the veterans administration to meet the needs and challenges of a new generation of veterans. the 21st century g.i. bill ensures those veterans get the opportunities they deserve. he so valued his own education, he went on to serve his community as a teacher after he graduated from college and became a principal, worked for the department of health, education and waverly and -- and welfare and hawaii office of education and opportunity. he won election to the senate in 199o. as chairman of the indian affairs committee dan has been an advocate for native americans. he has taught us all about history, history of hawaii and its native communities as well as issues facing indigeno
, while still being automobile to invest in things -- able to invest in things like education and research and development that are important to our growth, and if we're going to protect middle-class families, then we're going to have to have higher rates for the wealthiest americans, folks like me. >> white house correspondent dan lothian joins us live from washington this morning. nice to have you with us. >> good to see you. >> what's the next move for republicans, dan? >> well, you know, i think republicans are in a difficult spot here. one of the sticking points is this $800 billion in new tax revenue. this is part of speaker john boehner's proposal. it doesn't call for more taxes on the wealthy, but it does call for eliminating some deductions, closing loopholes. nonetheless, there are some conservatives who are pushing back on this. they think that this will hurt job growth and these are conservatives who are backed by the tea party. they're outright rejecting it. what you're seeing here developing is that republicans are not speaking with one voice. >> republicans should not be con
, whether paper orwhat not has to be compostable. that is education we have to have. dig out a phone book from the '70s hasn't been turned not compostable of anything, paper or otherwise has to be. you're using an argument that people used against styrofoam, big mac and whopper containers. it will cost more money. it wl put the guys out of business. they were all over your streets it back in the early 80s and '90s those coanies have done very well. i know you put up the bag and say, you hold up the bag and say you love the bag. someone doing that with styrofoam containers 15 or 20 years ago melissa: hang on i have to get a few words in here too. this is disagree with me. >> goahead. melissa: takes 91% more energy to recycle paper bag than plastic bag. i worry about that. so much easier to recycle bags. every store i go into the new york, when you walk to the front door to your left a full container has bags when people brought back. when i bring back a plalastic back i use it deat i don't buy bags for trash bins in my house. i use this. not like people take them and throw them away. gohe
next year. >> there are skills that have left the u.s. not necessarily education, but stopped producing that. >> how do we get that back is this. >> it's a converted effort to get them back. and with this project that i've talked about are we do a mac in the united states next year, i think this is another good step for us. >> software sales declining by 11% from last year, still better than 13% drop analysts had been expecting. hardware sales were down 13% while accessories dropped by 8%. >> and the john mcafee saga continues to unfold. the software guru is now back in a detention center in guatemala. he was taken to a hospital yesterday for what his lawyer described as two mild heart attacks. mcafee's attorney says his client suffers from anxiety and hypertension. the software pay near is being held by guatemalan authorities for entering the country illegally from belize. he fled belize after authority wanted to question him about the death of one of his neighbors. mcafee said the police were behind all of this, he's been set up in all of this, but he's also -- >> tattoo on his arm. >
in pakistan back in october, where she was campaigning for girls education. >>> and police in britain are talking to australian authorities about a prank call that took a tragic turn. >> a british nurse died on friday, three days after she accepted a call from two radio djs in australia who were impersonating queen elizabeth and prince charles. the nurse transferred that prank call to the ward where kate middleton was recovering from morning sickness. there are unconfirmed reports that the nurse killed herself. australian police confirm they have been contacted by police in london and the company that owns that radio station that started the prank says it will cooperate. >>> wedding bells are ringing in washington state, as couples lined up at midnight to get married. >> same-sex couples gathered to say "i do" as early as 12:01 this morning. hundreds of couples picked up their marriage licenses on thursday, but had to wait until today to officially get hitched. washington became one of the first states to pass same-sex marriage by a popular vote. >>> a south bacon signment car sales l
you an opportunity you can do. in matter your age education or experience, you can literally earn money on your own laptop from your own kitchen table 24/67. it is at least worth checking out. if you're sick of living paycheck to paycheck, worried about job security or retirement if your goal is to.earn extra money part-time or full time, they're adding my listeners in record numbers and giving away $1,000 to somebody just for checking them out. that could be you. lucky person. visit incomeathome.com. that's incomeathome.com. calls waiting. peter, the social media. >> on another topic bill, lots of people are asking us to comment on a big story that -- >> bill: uh-oh. >> today is the day -- >> bill: kate middleton left the hospital. >> we haven't gotten anything about that. >> bill: she did though. morning sickness -- severe morning sickness has subsided. >> it's over. she's feeling better. in washington state at midnight when the clock struck midnight, pot became legal. depending on who you ask. but
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 68 (some duplicates have been removed)